Why Kendrick Lamar, just like Tupac, is the voice of his gener...

Kendrick Lamar is carrying the torch Tupac left off.https://kulturehub.com/kendrick-lamar-tupac-voice-generation/

Posted by Kulture Hub on Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Kulture

Why Kendrick Lamar, just like Tupac, is the voice of his generation

21 years ago today, Tupac was shot and killed in Las Vegas after watching a Mike Tyson fight. The murderer still remains unknown to this day.

But at 25-years-old, Pac already accomplished more than most people can say they have in a lifetime. He had the hits, the movies, the marketing appeal, and one of the brightest futures in the game. But above all that, he was the voice of his generation.

No one kept it realer than Tupac when it came to talking about issues in society and what it really is like to be a black man in America. Every time he spoke you could feel what he was saying and see what he was seeing.

It would’ve been cool to see both Pac and Biggie continue to evolve as artists and actually collab with some of the artists today. Still, their presence is felt even two decades after dying.

While these young ass rappers today like Lil Yachty might not know the legends, there are still other students of the game who know the history of hip-hop and where the genre came from.

One of those emcees is of course Kendrick Lamar but he’s done more than just mastering his craft — he became the voice of his generation, just like Tupac.

Lyrically, they’re pretty different as Tupac spoke from that gangbanging perspective while Kendrick is more on the reporting from the streets/greatest rapper alive type shit.

As a child, Kung Fu Kenny actually witnessed Tupac filming a music video and that was the very moment he knew he wanted to do. For him to be in the position he is today is just a full circle thing.

Just like Tupac, Kendrick is using his talent and fame as a platform to raise awareness about what’s going in the hood. He’s picking his people up and taking it right where Pac left off. Peep the video above to see how Tupac’s influence helped Kendrick Lamar.

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